PHOTO: Liam Doran
PHOTO: Liam Doran

Scenes From the 18th Annual Powder Awards

A selection of images from an unforgettable night in Breckenridge

Under a starry Colorado night, skiers from across the continent gathered at the Riverwalk Center in Breckenridge to kick off winter at the 18th Annual Powder Awards and recognize the top achievements in skiing and ski movies. The biggest winners of the night included Tatum Monod for Best Female Performance, Sammy Carlson for Best Male Performance, and Numinous, a film by Dendrite Studios with Kye Petersen, for Movie of the Year. Enjoy scenes from the Biggest Night In Skiing.

Read more: Community, Gratitude, and Self-Expression Highlighted at the 18th Annual Powder Awards.

Welcome to the 18th Annual Powder Awards, held at the Riverwalk Center in Breckenridge, Colorado. PHOTO: Liam Doran

PHOTO: Liam Doran

PHOTO: David Reddick

Olympic gold medalist, dinner roll pioneer, and mogul master Jonny Moseley hosted the night’s show. PHOTO: David Reddick

And the first award goes to… Tanner Hall. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Jonny Moseley welcomed Tanner Hall onstage for his Best Air win. In his acceptance speech, Hall encouraged everyone to be themselves and focus on what really matters: skiing. PHOTO: David Reddick

A rejuvenated Tanner Hall imparting his heartfelt and thoughtful perspectives. PHOTO: David Reddick

Tatum Monod was absolutely gracious in her acceptance of her awards for Best Female Performance and third place in the Powder Poll. PHOTO: Liam Doran

PHOTO: Jamie Walter

Photographer Ming T. Poon accepts his award for the 2018 Photo of the Year. PHOTO: Liam Doran

The Photo of the Year auction raised almost $5,000 for the High Fives Foundation. PHOTO: Mike Yoshida

DPS visionary Ben Sturgulewski accepts the award for Best Cinematography for his short film, The Time Within, for DPS Cinematic. Ten years ago, Best Cinematography was the first award Sturgulewski had ever won, originally with Sweetgrass Productions. Accepting the award for the second time was meaningful, he said. PHOTO: Mike Yoshida

Voted first place in the 2018 Powder Poll, Caroline Gleich had some thoughtful points to make about climate change and activism. PHOTO: Mike Yoshida

Keegan Kilbride was the hands-down winner for Breakthrough Performance. This guy is the epitome of style and fearlessness in the urban arena. PHOTO: Jamie Walter

Logan Pehota won Best Line in Dendrite Studios’ Numinous. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Logan Pehota humbly accepted his Best Line nod. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Beer. PHOTO: Jamie Walter

Beyond his overall influence and collaboration with Dendrite Studios on Numinous, Kye Petersen reluctantly accepted the Full Throttle award, stating that he’s a more calculated and controlled skier than that particular award warrants. We hear Kye’s point, however, this award was given to him for the sheer amount of big faces he descended and the creative skill and ability with which he did it. PHOTO: Liam Doran

DJ Viking dropping all the beats. PHOTO: Liam Doran

All-around great guy LJ Strenio pulled in Best Jib. He earned this one with blood, sweat, tears, and more blood. PHOTO: Brady Ferdig

LJ Strenio was awed in meeting Jonny Moseley. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Chris Benchetler accepting third place in the Powder Poll. PHOTO: Mike Yoshida

The inaugural Moving Mountains award went to Auden Schendler for his leadership and vision in addressing big scale solutions to mitigating climate change. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Amie Engerbretson was the host of the red carpet show, aired on Facebook Live. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Moseley brought the good vibes all night long. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Moseley pulled this young local shred from the crowd onstage to open the envelope and announce the Movie of the Year winner. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Movie of the Year winners, Dendrite Studios’ Numinous (L-R: Nicolas Teichrob, Kye Petersen, Logan Pehota, Wiley Miller, Tatum Monod). PHOTO: Mike Yoshida

Hugely deserving winner of the night, Kye Petersen. PHOTO: Liam Doran

Wiley Miller was fired up backstage. PHOTO: David Reddick

The Powder Awards belong to the filmmakers and athletes. Respect. PHOTO: David Reddick

PHOTO: David Reddick